>Ghanaian Names Return: A Trend?

> Recently, Ghanaian traditional names seem to have gained popularity. FAF spotted it first here.

He writes:

A trend that I’ve seen lately though suggests that might be about to change in the next generation. I cant say I’ve done much research into this so it’s based largely of a few friends that I’d lost contact wiht suddenly popping up on Facebook and other places with the English names gone.

It’s nothing drastic like coming up with a whole new name, just simply dropping the English one and letting the usually Ghanaian middle names take precedence.

Victoria is now Nana Ama
Isaac is Nene
Franklin changed to Kojo Ohene
Raymond morphed into Paa Kojo
Dorcas likes to be called Nana Konadu
Bright is now Kwame

The phenomenon is jokingly called “Name Dropping”, by above mentioned blogger. Remember where you heard it first!

So, Ghanaians like their Ghanaian names – and why shouldn’t they?

As a foreigner living in this country I have also adopted one. I’m EwuraAma to some friends, neighbors, business contacts unhidden joy. Sometimes I use it beacuse it is practical. My Swedish name (Tagsa? Aiysha?) is often not heard right and NEVER spelled right – but other times it isn’t even about practicality, I just want to show people I care about Ghanaian culture and that I am trying my best to be a part of it.

At the other end, I also find it easier to remember Ghanaian names since they many times can be related to a weekday, which leads to a discussion “oh, so you are also born on a Saturday, then we’re twins!” or “I have a good friend who is also a Thursday born!”.

The only problem with this trend is that sometimes when I meet with friends half of us, both men and women, are called Nana!

Pic: Painting at the DuBois Center that I snapped some time back and I now feel illustrates this topic very well.